Usdmagnet.com Review Is USD MAGNET Scam or Should I Invest

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Usdmagnet.com Review: Is USD MAGNET Scam or Should I Invest?

An official website of the United States government

Here’s how you know

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you’re on a federal government site.

The site is secure.
The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

Ask questions. Fraudsters are counting on you not to investigate before you invest. Fend them off by doing your own digging. It’s not enough to ask for more information or for references – fraudsters have no incentive to set you straight. Take the time to do your own independent research. For more about information see Ask Questions.

Research before you invest. Unsolicited emails, message board postings, and company news releases should never be used as the sole basis for your investment decisions. Understand a company’s business and its products or services before investing. Look for the company’s financial statements on the SEC’s EDGAR filing system. You can also check out many investments by searching EDGAR.

Know the salesperson. Spend some time checking out the person touting the investment before you invest – even if you already know the person socially. Always find out whether the securities salespeople who contact you are licensed to sell securities in your state and whether they or their firms have had run-ins with regulators or other investors. You can check out the disciplinary history of brokers and advisers for free using the SEC’s and FINRA’s online databases. Your state securities regulator may have additional information.

Be wary of unsolicited offers.Be especially careful if you receive an unsolicited pitch to invest in a company, or see it praised online, but can’t find current financial information about it from independent sources. It could be a “pump and dump” scheme. Be wary if someone recommends foreign or “off-shore” investments. If something goes wrong, it’s harder to find out what happened and to locate money sent abroad.

Protect yourself online. Online and social marketing sites offer a wealth of opportunity for fraudsters. For tips on how to protect yourself online see Protect Your Social Media Accounts.

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Know what to look for. Make yourself knowledgeable about different types of fraud and red flags that may signal investment fraud.

Red flags for fraud and common persuasion tactics

How do successful, financially intelligent people fall prey to investment fraud? Researchers have found that investment fraudsters hit their targets with an array of persuasion techniques that are tailored to the victim’s psychological profile. Here are red flags to look for:

If it sounds too good to be true, it is. Watch for “phantom riches.” Compare promised yields with current returns on well-know stock indexes. Any investment opportunity that claims you’ll receive substantially more could be highly risky – and that means you might lose money. Be careful of claims that an investment will make “incredible gains,” is a “breakout stock pick” or has “huge upside and almost no risk!” Claims like these are hallmarks of extreme risk or outright fraud.

“Guaranteed returns” aren’t. Every investment carries some degree of risk, which is reflected in the rate of return you can expect to receive. If your money is perfectly safe, you’ll most likely get a low return. High returns entail high risks, possibly including a total loss on the investments. Most fraudsters spend a lot of time trying to convince investors that extremely high returns are “guaranteed” or “can’t miss.” They try to plant an image in your head of what your life will be like when you are rich. Don’t believe it.

Beware the “halo” effect. Investors can be blinded by a “halo” effect when a con artist comes across as likeable or trustworthy. Credibility can be faked. Check out actual qualifications.

“Everyone is buying it.” Watch out for pitches that stress how “everyone is investing in this, so you should, too.” Think about whether you are interested in the product. If a sales presentation focuses on how many others have bought the product, this could be a red flag.

Pressure to send money RIGHT NOW. Scam artists often tell their victims that this is a once-in-a-lifetime offer and it will be gone tomorrow. But resist the pressure to invest quickly and take the time you need to investigate before sending money.

Reciprocity. Fraudsters often try to lure investors through free investment seminars, figuring if they do a small favor for you, such as supplying a free lunch, you will do a big favor for them and invest in their product. There is never a reason to make a quick decision on an investment. If you attend a free lunch, take the material home and research both the investment and the individual selling it before you invest. Always make sure the product is right for you and that you understand what you are buying and all the associated fees.

Where can I go for help?

If you have a question or concern about an investment, or you think you have encountered one of these frauds, please contact the SEC, FINRA, or your state securities regulator to report the fraud and to get assistance.

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
Office of Investor Education and Advocacy
100 F Street, NE
Washington, DC 20549-0213
Telephone: (800) 732-0330
Fax: (202) 772-9295

Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA)
FINRA Complaints and Tips
9509 Key West Avenue
Rockville, MD 20850
Telephone: (301) 590-6500
Fax: (866) 397-3290

North American Securities Administrators Association (NASAA)
750 First Street NE
Suite 1140
Washington, DC 20002
Telephone: (202) 737-0900
Fax: (202) 783-3571

The Motley Fool Reviews

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I have made money on their recommendations way more times than not.

Dishonest company that takes NO responsibility for the junk that comes out of their mouth!

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IF WE HAVE TO DO OUR OWN RESEARCH TO FIND OUT SUCH A BIG “RED FLAG” WHY ARE WE PAYING YOU. WHAT KIND OF BAD ADVICE ARE YOU GIVING PEOPLE WHO INVEST THEIR HARD EARNED MONEY ON YOUR WORD, WHICH YOU TAKE MONEY FROM US FOR. THERE A BUNCH OF DISHONEST KNUCKLEHEADS AT MOTLEY FOOL! KEEP AWAY.

Luckin coffee!

Luckin coffee!! Ha ha I’ll chalk it up to experience losing 80% of my investment on a motley tip! Please take my advice, you do not need to pay $100 to get recommendations on amazon, Netflix, Starbucks, Tesla stock. anything they recommend outside these, have bombed. Total scam, avoid!

I see a recent unauthorized credit card…

I see a recent unauthorized credit card charge from your company on my Capitol One Credit card. I once subscribed to your services, over 15 years ago and cancelled my subscription, I have no account with you, I no longer have the email account I used to subscribe, I have received nothing from your company since that time period. How is this happening? I want this charge reversed immediately and I am contacting my credit card company to advise as well. How is it your company can charge someones credit card after all these years? The card has a different number and has expired multiple times. There is clearly something very illegal happening here. Fix this now. I will not stop alerting the public to your devious business practices until it is.
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Solid Foolish advice about stock…

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Should i choose Motley Fool

Dear Sirs,
Motley Fools do not seem to do well with their customers. My observation is based on purely by reading all 474 reviews written by the users.
There is a way too many complaints- I read reviews because i would like to pay to get some professionals around me to supply me the information which i do not have time and skills to acquire myself.

What is going on guys? You are in business so i would imagine that you would also willing to keep your business profitable.

Based on this reviews, do you thing your marketing does a good job?
How much i really need to pay yearly to access all data you create?

Kind regards
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Thank you for your feedback.

We understand that many of our potential members may read reviews on sites such as this before signing up with us. You’re right – there are reviews complaining about (for example) the number of emails people are receiving. This is something that’s easy to fix. At the bottom of every marketing email, there is a link to unsubscribe. Additionally, you can log into Fool.com, click on “My Fool” in the upper right-hand corner, and then click on “Email Settings.” This will allow you to adjust your email settings to your preferences.

In regards to our marketing, we’re listening to our members and adjusting to their needs and preferences. For example, we recently tested allowing some of our members to “snooze” our promotional emails for one month, three months, or unsubscribe entirely. Or we make other changes – within one of our services, we now feature a “Monday Morning Briefing,” which gives a summary of the past week and things to look for in the week ahead.

Some of the other reviews are because of confusion in terms of pricing or renewals. Our renewal policy is clearly stated in our Terms and Conditions, which is available on the order page as well as at the bottom of Fool.com. Many other companies offering subscription services automatically renew their services at the end of the term. Before placing an order with us, there’s a box you must check saying you agree to our Terms and Conditions. In regards to the automatic renewal feature: our members can reach out to Member Services at any time during their subscription period to have their automatic renewal disabled. They can also go to “My Fool” and then “Account Settings” to see when their services are set to renew or expire.

We offer a range of services at different price points, but we don’t expect our members to join every service! There isn’t one singular investing strategy which works for all investors. Our services aren’t upgrades of each other – they simple follow different investing strategies and have different resulting risk profiles. We offer many services because we want our members to find the best fit for their investing needs.

Don’t Be Fooled By These 3 Money Scams

It’s surprisingly easy to fall prey to a financial con, and not just because we want to believe that we, too, can get rich quick.

Even if you’re making sincere efforts to save and invest for your future, it can be hard to get ahead financially. Making that task even harder is that many of us occasionally fall for scams that can rob us not only of money but also of time and energy.

Here, then, is a review of three money scams that you might run across, with tips for spotting them and avoiding them and other financial scams.

Image source: Getty Images.

The penny-stock pump and dump

Penny stocks ensnare many investors — especially newer and less sophisticated ones. That’s because if you don’t understand some investing basics, they can seem like wonderful opportunities.

A penny stock is one that’s trading for less than about $5 per share. Such low prices can make it seem like the stock is a bargain — to those who don’t understand that a stock’s price alone means little. A $1 stock can still plunge and become a $0.25 one. And a $200 stock can always grow into a $400 one.

Penny stocks are usually tied to unproven, volatile companies, often with little to no earnings. And while the companies themselves may be entirely legitimate — albeit young or small — their stock prices are easily manipulated by scammers because they have relatively small market caps, and don’t usually trade heavily.

The classic pump-and-dump maneuver is an unfortunately great example: First, the ambitious con artists buy lots of shares of a penny stock, then starts hyping the company in newsletters, online, in day trader chat rooms, and elsewhere. They’ll present a compelling story, claiming that the company is on the verge of curing cancer, proving a new oil field, or exploiting some other figurative gold mine.

Naive investors will get excited, start buying shares, and push the price higher. The rising prices will often excite further investors to buy in too, adding more hot air to the bubble. The scammers will then quickly sell their shares at the inflated prices and reap the profits. Afterward, they turn off the hype machine, (and the company may publicly debunk the rumors) share prices fall back to their natural levels, and those who took the bait get stuck with the losses.

You can avoid penny stock heartaches simply by steering clear of companies with very low share prices — no matter how much you might love to own, say, 5,000 shares of a company for only $500. Also, beware of compelling stories that seem too good to be true. If the stock is really so great, those in the know would be buying all the shares they could, not telling others to do so.

Ponzi schemes

There may be fewer Ponzi schemes out there than penny stock cons, but it’s valuable to be able to spot their characteristics — because there are some criminals out there using the model. The most famous one — they tend only to become famous after their frauds unravel — is now-jailed Bernie Madoff.

Ponzi schemes claim to offer high and consistent returns via “secret” investing strategies or other vague but profitable-sounding techniques — but in fact, they are cooking the books, and using the money from new investors to create illusory “profits” for the earlier ones. The investors’ assets aren’t growing, of course. There’s no savvy money management nor clever investing tactics — just schemers moving funds around behind the curtain, and siphoning off large amounts of it for themselves. But at some point, investors in need of their funds will invariably attempt to cash out more than the fraudsters have left in the tank, and if the new money has dried up, the whole thing will implode as con artists have to admit they can’t pay their investors what they’ve been promised.

Per the Securities and Exchange Commission, here are some signs of a Ponzi scheme. (These red flags apply to many other kinds of scams, too.)

  • Low risk, high returns: If you’re presented with any investment opportunity that’s described as offering very low risk and very high returns — or, worse, an opportunity that’s “guaranteed” to deliver high returns, beware. In general, high potential returns are linked to high risk. Lottery tickets, for example, feature a high possible reward, but a much higher risk of losing all the money you spend on them, while government bonds offer a relatively low rewards, but little risk.
  • Unregistered investments: Any time you plan to park your hard-earned dollars in an investment, make sure that it’s registered with the SEC or state regulators. As the SEC explains, “Registration is important because it provides investors with access to information about the company’s management, products, services, and finances.” Look into the registration status of any unusual investment opportunity you’re offered — do not just take the seller’s word for it.
  • Unlicensed sellers: Federal and state laws require people and companies selling investments to be registered or licensed. Ask about the status of anyone you’re dealing with, and then verify it.
  • Complex and secret strategies: How will your friendly fraudsters deliver those massive returns they promise? Naturally, it’s because they’ve found a secret formula. It’s complicated. They could show you the math, but it’s proprietary and you wouldn’t understand it anyway. Just. trust them. (Well, they can’t just come out and tell you that they’re scamming you, right?) If you don’t understand an investment, stay away from it.
  • Paperwork problems: Solid investment companies have solid reporting systems, regularly sending accurate and statements to investors that are relatively easy to understand. If you’re not getting statements on time, or if you’re spotting errors or confusing things in them, that’s not professional or reassuring. Take a closer look, and ask questions.
  • Difficulty receiving payments: If you experience any resistance when trying to withdraw money, or you’re don’t receive promised payments on time, that’s a huge red flag. If, when trying to withdraw money, you’re offered even better returns to stay invested, that’s another warning sign.
  • Unnaturally consistent returns: Ponzi schemes and other scams often feature very consistent returns — but that deserves your skepticism, not admiration. Yes, over long periods the stock market has always tended to go up, but from week to week and year to year, its results are lumpy, and even the most clever hedging strategy can’t turn those lumps perfectly smooth. The table below lists the S&P 500’s returns over the past 18 years, clearly showing why any investment tied to the stock market is likely to feature varying returns, not consistent ones.
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